Microcosm of a Myriad

This Can All Coexist, I Promise

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sarahexplosions:

inoriaizawa:

in honor of Mean Girls’ 10th anniversary, here’s an incredibly subtle but completely extraordinary joke that you’ve probably never noticed from the movie (I saw it at least a dozen times before it dawned on me): Regina George started a rumor that Janis Ian was a lesbian in the 8th grade, but it wasn’t out of malice… it was because Janis told her that she was Lebanese

AU in when Brittany is Regina George

I’m pretty sure that that’s what ‘Comeback’ was all about tho.

Filed under sarahexplosions glee glee adjacent

732 notes

burtmacklin:




Whether we get called Dogs of the Military, or cursed as devils, Al and I are going to get our bodies back. But even so, we’re not devils, let alone gods. We’re human. We’re human! We can’t even save one little girl. We’re just insignificant humans.


Like the best Greek tragedies, Fullmetal Alchemist asks us accept both the best and worst of human nature. It is a series populated by characters who would willingly be tried as war criminals if it meant bringing themselves to justice, who would open their homes to complete strangers—yet it is also populated by the likes of Shou Tucker, who would transform his own daughter into a wretched, half-human creature.
So what conclusion can we then draw from Fullmetal Alchemist about what it means to be human? Perhaps that human beings are neither wholly good nor wholly bad, but that they can turn even the worst actions into feats of incredible nobility. After putting the Shou Tucker case to rest, Roy Mustang warns Edward and Alphonse that this will not be the last case of its kind, and that they too may be driven to commit acts of evil. Yet Shou Tucker doesn’t drive Edward or Alphonse to abandon their principles. Instead, he strengthens their commitment to protecting their loved ones, to not killing even the most terrible among them, and to never abandoning others for their own gain. The Elrics’ journey toward saving their country could never have begun had they not trespassed on God’s terrain. Roy and Riza could not have had a hand in repairing the relationship between Ishval and Amestris had they not learned from their participation in its destruction.
This is not to say that Fullmetal Alchemist seeks to justify suffering. It means only that Fullmetal Alchemist illustrates the human capacity to turn pain into beauty. Neither Roy, Riza, nor the Elric brothers take the easy road by sticking to their principles. Yet even though Roy and Riza must hold themselves accountable—even though Ed must give up part of his own life to avoid taking that of a truly despicable person (Kimblee)—none of them give up. So yes, human beings are capable of both good and evil, but what sets us apart is our ability to better ourselves and the world around us, even at great costs—like alchemists, we create from what we destroy.

burtmacklin:

Whether we get called Dogs of the Military, or cursed as devils, Al and I are going to get our bodies back. But even so, we’re not devils, let alone gods. We’re human. We’re human! We can’t even save one little girl. We’re just insignificant humans.

Like the best Greek tragedies, Fullmetal Alchemist asks us accept both the best and worst of human nature. It is a series populated by characters who would willingly be tried as war criminals if it meant bringing themselves to justice, who would open their homes to complete strangers—yet it is also populated by the likes of Shou Tucker, who would transform his own daughter into a wretched, half-human creature.

So what conclusion can we then draw from Fullmetal Alchemist about what it means to be human? Perhaps that human beings are neither wholly good nor wholly bad, but that they can turn even the worst actions into feats of incredible nobility. After putting the Shou Tucker case to rest, Roy Mustang warns Edward and Alphonse that this will not be the last case of its kind, and that they too may be driven to commit acts of evil. Yet Shou Tucker doesn’t drive Edward or Alphonse to abandon their principles. Instead, he strengthens their commitment to protecting their loved ones, to not killing even the most terrible among them, and to never abandoning others for their own gain. The Elrics’ journey toward saving their country could never have begun had they not trespassed on God’s terrain. Roy and Riza could not have had a hand in repairing the relationship between Ishval and Amestris had they not learned from their participation in its destruction.

This is not to say that Fullmetal Alchemist seeks to justify suffering. It means only that Fullmetal Alchemist illustrates the human capacity to turn pain into beauty. Neither Roy, Riza, nor the Elric brothers take the easy road by sticking to their principles. Yet even though Roy and Riza must hold themselves accountable—even though Ed must give up part of his own life to avoid taking that of a truly despicable person (Kimblee)—none of them give up. So yes, human beings are capable of both good and evil, but what sets us apart is our ability to better ourselves and the world around us, even at great costs—like alchemists, we create from what we destroy.

(via trionerd)

Filed under Fullmetal Alchemist best manga best show best everything basically how queue you do?